1. 02 Nov, 2017 1 commit
    • Greg Kroah-Hartman's avatar
      License cleanup: add SPDX GPL-2.0 license identifier to files with no license · b2441318
      Greg Kroah-Hartman authored
      Many source files in the tree are missing licensing information, which
      makes it harder for compliance tools to determine the correct license.
      
      By default all files without license information are under the default
      license of the kernel, which is GPL version 2.
      
      Update the files which contain no license information with the 'GPL-2.0'
      SPDX license identifier.  The SPDX identifier is a legally binding
      shorthand, which can be used instead of the full boiler plate text.
      
      This patch is based on work done by Thomas Gleixner and Kate Stewart and
      Philippe Ombredanne.
      
      How this work was done:
      
      Patches were generated and checked against linux-4.14-rc6 for a subset of
      the use cases:
       - file had no licensing information it it.
       - file was a */uapi/* one with no licensing information in it,
       - file was a */uapi/* one with existing licensing information,
      
      Further patches will be generated in subsequent months to fix up cases
      where non-standard license headers were used, and references to license
      had to be inferred by heuristics based on keywords.
      
      The analysis to determine which SPDX License Identifier to be applied to
      a file was done in a spreadsheet of side by side results from of the
      output of two independent scanners (ScanCode & Windriver) producing SPDX
      tag:value files created by Philippe Ombredanne.  Philippe prepared the
      base worksheet, and did an initial spot review of a few 1000 files.
      
      The 4.13 kernel was the starting point of the analysis with 60,537 files
      assessed.  Kate Stewart did a file by file comparison of the scanner
      results in the spreadsheet to determine which SPDX license identifier(s)
      to be applied to the file. She confirmed any determination that was not
      immediately clear with lawyers working with the Linux Foundation.
      
      Criteria used to select files for SPDX license identifier tagging was:
       - Files considered eligible had to be source code files.
       - Make and config files were included as candidates if they contained >5
         lines of source
       - File already had some variant of a license header in it (even if <5
         lines).
      
      All documentation files were explicitly excluded.
      
      The following heuristics were used to determine which SPDX license
      identifiers to apply.
      
       - when both scanners couldn't find any license traces, file was
         considered to have no license information in it, and the top level
         COPYING file license applied.
      
         For non */uapi/* files that summary was:
      
         SPDX license identifier                            # files
         ---------------------------------------------------|-------
         GPL-2.0                                              11139
      
         and resulted in the first patch in this series.
      
         If that file was a */uapi/* path one, it was "GPL-2.0 WITH
         Linux-syscall-note" otherwise it was "GPL-2.0".  Results of that was:
      
         SPDX license identifier                            # files
         ---------------------------------------------------|-------
         GPL-2.0 WITH Linux-syscall-note                        930
      
         and resulted in the second patch in this series.
      
       - if a file had some form of licensing information in it, and was one
         of the */uapi/* ones, it was denoted with the Linux-syscall-note if
         any GPL family license was found in the file or had no licensing in
         it (per prior point).  Results summary:
      
         SPDX license identifier                            # files
         ---------------------------------------------------|------
         GPL-2.0 WITH Linux-syscall-note                       270
         GPL-2.0+ WITH Linux-syscall-note                      169
         ((GPL-2.0 WITH Linux-syscall-note) OR BSD-2-Clause)    21
         ((GPL-2.0 WITH Linux-syscall-note) OR BSD-3-Clause)    17
         LGPL-2.1+ WITH Linux-syscall-note                      15
         GPL-1.0+ WITH Linux-syscall-note                       14
         ((GPL-2.0+ WITH Linux-syscall-note) OR BSD-3-Clause)    5
         LGPL-2.0+ WITH Linux-syscall-note                       4
         LGPL-2.1 WITH Linux-syscall-note                        3
         ((GPL-2.0 WITH Linux-syscall-note) OR MIT)              3
         ((GPL-2.0 WITH Linux-syscall-note) AND MIT)             1
      
         and that resulted in the third patch in this series.
      
       - when the two scanners agreed on the detected license(s), that became
         the concluded license(s).
      
       - when there was disagreement between the two scanners (one detected a
         license but the other didn't, or they both detected different
         licenses) a manual inspection of the file occurred.
      
       - In most cases a manual inspection of the information in the file
         resulted in a clear resolution of the license that should apply (and
         which scanner probably needed to revisit its heuristics).
      
       - When it was not immediately clear, the license identifier was
         confirmed with lawyers working with the Linux Foundation.
      
       - If there was any question as to the appropriate license identifier,
         the file was flagged for further research and to be revisited later
         in time.
      
      In total, over 70 hours of logged manual review was done on the
      spreadsheet to determine the SPDX license identifiers to apply to the
      source files by Kate, Philippe, Thomas and, in some cases, confirmation
      by lawyers working with the Linux Foundation.
      
      Kate also obtained a third independent scan of the 4.13 code base from
      FOSSology, and compared selected files where the other two scanners
      disagreed against that SPDX file, to see if there was new insights.  The
      Windriver scanner is based on an older version of FOSSology in part, so
      they are related.
      
      Thomas did random spot checks in about 500 files from the spreadsheets
      for the uapi headers and agreed with SPDX license identifier in the
      files he inspected. For the non-uapi files Thomas did random spot checks
      in about 15000 files.
      
      In initial set of patches against 4.14-rc6, 3 files were found to have
      copy/paste license identifier errors, and have been fixed to reflect the
      correct identifier.
      
      Additionally Philippe spent 10 hours this week doing a detailed manual
      inspection and review of the 12,461 patched files from the initial patch
      version early this week with:
       - a full scancode scan run, collecting the matched texts, detected
         license ids and scores
       - reviewing anything where there was a license detected (about 500+
         files) to ensure that the applied SPDX license was correct
       - reviewing anything where there was no detection but the patch license
         was not GPL-2.0 WITH Linux-syscall-note to ensure that the applied
         SPDX license was correct
      
      This produced a worksheet with 20 files needing minor correction.  This
      worksheet was then exported into 3 different .csv files for the
      different types of files to be modified.
      
      These .csv files were then reviewed by Greg.  Thomas wrote a script to
      parse the csv files and add the proper SPDX tag to the file, in the
      format that the file expected.  This script was further refined by Greg
      based on the output to detect more types of files automatically and to
      distinguish between header and source .c files (which need different
      comment types.)  Finally Greg ran the script using the .csv files to
      generate the patches.
      Reviewed-by: default avatarKate Stewart <kstewart@linuxfoundation.org>
      Reviewed-by: default avatarPhilippe Ombredanne <pombredanne@nexb.com>
      Reviewed-by: default avatarThomas Gleixner <tglx@linutronix.de>
      Signed-off-by: default avatarGreg Kroah-Hartman <gregkh@linuxfoundation.org>
      b2441318
  2. 25 Feb, 2015 2 commits
  3. 18 Jun, 2013 1 commit
  4. 25 Oct, 2012 1 commit
  5. 27 Sep, 2012 2 commits
  6. 01 Jul, 2011 1 commit
    • Arnaud Lacombe's avatar
      kconfig: introduce specialized printer · e54e692b
      Arnaud Lacombe authored
      Make conf_write_symbol() grammar agnostic to be able to use it from different
      code path. These path pass a printer callback which will print a symbol's name
      and its value in different format.
      
      conf_write_symbol()'s job become mostly only to prepare a string for the
      printer. This avoid to have to pass specialized flag to generic
      functions
      Signed-off-by: default avatarArnaud Lacombe <lacombar@gmail.com>
      [mmarek: rebased on top of de125187 (kconfig: autogenerated config_is_xxx
      macro)]
      Signed-off-by: default avatarMichal Marek <mmarek@suse.cz>
      e54e692b
  7. 19 Sep, 2010 1 commit
  8. 17 Aug, 2010 1 commit
  9. 03 Aug, 2010 1 commit
    • Sam Ravnborg's avatar
      kconfig: add savedefconfig · 7cf3d73b
      Sam Ravnborg authored
      savedefconfig will save a minimal config to a file
      named "defconfig".
      
      The config symbols are saved in the same order as
      they appear in the menu structure so it should
      be possible to map them to the relevant menus
      if desired.
      
      The implementation was tested against several minimal
      configs for arm which was created using brute-force.
      
      There was one regression related to default numbers
      which had their valid range further limited by another symbol.
      
      Sample:
      
      config FOO
      	int "foo"
      	default 4
      
      config BAR
      	int "bar"
      	range 0 FOO
      
      If FOO is set to 3 then BAR cannot take a value higher than 3.
      But the current implementation will set BAR equal to 4.
      
      This is seldomly used and the final configuration is OK,
      and the fix was non-trivial.
      So it was documented in the code and left as is.
      Signed-off-by: default avatarSam Ravnborg <sam@ravnborg.org>
      Acked-by: default avatarUwe Kleine-König <u.kleine-koenig@pengutronix.de>
      Signed-off-by: default avatarMichal Marek <mmarek@suse.cz>
      7cf3d73b
  10. 14 Apr, 2010 1 commit
    • Li Zefan's avatar
      menuconfig: add support to show hidden options which have prompts · 22c7eca6
      Li Zefan authored
      Usage:
        Press <Z> to show all config symbols which have prompts.
      
      Quote Tim Bird:
      
      | I've been bitten by this numerous times.  I most often
      | use ftrace on ARM, but when I go back to x86, I almost
      | always go through a sequence of searching for the
      | function graph tracer in the menus, then realizing it's
      | completely missing until I disable CC_OPTIMIZE_FOR_SIZE.
      |
      | Is there any way to have the menu item appear, but be
      | unsettable unless the SIZE option is disabled?  I'm
      | not a Kconfig guru...
      
      I myself found this useful too. For example, I need to test
      ftrace/tracing and want to be sure all the tracing features are
      enabled, so I  enter the "Tracers" menu, and press <Z> to
      see if there is any config hidden.
      
      I also noticed gconfig and xconfig have a button "Show all options",
      but that's a bit too much, and I think normally what we are not
      interested in those configs which have no prompt thus can't be
      changed by users.
      
      Exmaple:
      
            --- Tracers
            -*-   Kernel Function Tracer
            - -     Kernel Function Graph Tracer
            [*]   Interrupts-off Latency Tracer
            - -   Preemption-off Latency Tracer
            [*]   Sysprof Tracer
      
      Here you can see 2 tracers are not selectable, and then can find
      out how to make them selectable.
      Signed-off-by: default avatarLi Zefan <lizf@cn.fujitsu.com>
      Signed-off-by: default avatarMichal Marek <mmarek@suse.cz>
      22c7eca6
  11. 02 Feb, 2010 1 commit
  12. 20 Sep, 2009 1 commit
  13. 28 Apr, 2008 1 commit
    • Roman Zippel's avatar
      kconfig: add named choice group · 5a1aa8a1
      Roman Zippel authored
      As choice dependency are now fully checked, it's quite easy to add support
      for named choices. This lifts the restriction that a choice value can only
      appear once, although it still has to be within the same group,
      but multiple choices can be joined by giving them a name.
      While at it I cleaned up a little the choice type logic to simplify it a
      bit.
      Signed-off-by: default avatarRoman Zippel <zippel@linux-m68k.org>
      Signed-off-by: default avatarSam Ravnborg <sam@ravnborg.org>
      5a1aa8a1
  14. 17 Nov, 2007 2 commits
    • Sam Ravnborg's avatar
      x86: simplify "make ARCH=x86" and fix kconfig all.config · 6840999b
      Sam Ravnborg authored
      Simplify "make ARCH=x86" and fix kconfig so we again can set 64BIT in
      all.config.
      
      For a fix the diffstat is nice:
       6 files changed, 3 insertions(+), 36 deletions(-)
      
      The patch reverts these commits:
       - 0f855aa6 ("kconfig: add helper to set
         config symbol from environment variable")
       - 2a113281 ("kconfig: use $K64BIT to
         set 64BIT with all*config targets")
      
      Roman Zippel pointed out that kconfig supported string compares so
      the additional complexity introduced by the above two patches were
      not needed.
      
      With this patch we have following behaviour:
      
        # make {allno,allyes,allmod,rand}config [ARCH=...]
        option \ host arch      | 32bit         | 64bit
        =====================================================
        ./.                     | 32bit         | 64bit
        ARCH=x86                | 32bit         | 32bit
        ARCH=i386               | 32bit         | 32bit
        ARCH=x86_64             | 64bit         | 64bit
      
      The general rule are that ARCH= and native architecture takes
      precedence over the configuration.
      
      So make ARCH=i386 [whatever] will always build a 32-bit kernel
      no matter what the configuration says.  The configuration will
      be updated to 32-bit if it was configured to 64-bit and the
      other way around.
      
      This behaviour is consistent with previous behaviour so no
      suprises here.
      
      make ARCH=x86 will per default result in a 32-bit kernel but as
      the only ARCH= value x86 allow the user to select between 32-bit
      and 64-bit using menuconfig.
      Signed-off-by: default avatarSam Ravnborg <sam@ravnborg.org>
      Cc: Roman Zippel <zippel@linux-m68k.org>
      Cc: Andreas Herrmann <aherrman@arcor.de>
      Cc: Thomas Gleixner <tglx@linutronix.de>
      Cc: Ingo Molnar <mingo@redhat.com>
      Cc: "H. Peter Anvin" <hpa@zytor.com>
      Signed-off-by: default avatarLinus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
      6840999b
    • Sam Ravnborg's avatar
      x86: simplify "make ARCH=x86" and fix kconfig all.config · 80ef88d6
      Sam Ravnborg authored
      Simplify "make ARCH=x86" and fix kconfig so we again
      can set 64BIT in all.config.
      
      For a fix the diffstat is nice:
       6 files changed, 3 insertions(+), 36 deletions(-)
      
      The patch reverts these commits:
      0f855aa6
      -> kconfig: add helper to set config symbol from environment variable
      
      2a113281
      -> kconfig: use $K64BIT to set 64BIT with all*config targets
      
      Roman Zippel pointed out that kconfig supported string
      compares so the additional complexity introduced by the
      above two patches were not needed.
      
      With this patch we have following behaviour:
      
      # make {allno,allyes,allmod,rand}config [ARCH=...]
      option \ host arch      | 32bit         | 64bit
      =====================================================
      ./.                     | 32bit         | 64bit
      ARCH=x86                | 32bit         | 32bit
      ARCH=i386               | 32bit         | 32bit
      ARCH=x86_64             | 64bit         | 64bit
      
      The general rule are that ARCH= and native architecture
      takes precedence over the configuration.
      So make ARCH=i386 [whatever] will always build a 32-bit
      kernel no matter what the configuration says.
      The configuration will be updated to 32-bit if it was
      configured to 64-bit and the other way around.
      
      This behaviour is consistent with previous behaviour so
      no suprises here.
      
      make ARCH=x86 will per default result in a 32-bit kernel
      but as the only ARCH= value x86 allow the user to select
      between 32-bit and 64-bit using menuconfig. 
      Signed-off-by: default avatarSam Ravnborg <sam@ravnborg.org>
      Cc: Roman Zippel <zippel@linux-m68k.org>
      Cc: Andreas Herrmann <aherrman@arcor.de>
      Cc: Thomas Gleixner <tglx@linutronix.de>
      Cc: Ingo Molnar <mingo@redhat.com>
      Cc: "H. Peter Anvin" <hpa@zytor.com>
      80ef88d6
  15. 12 Nov, 2007 1 commit
  16. 25 Jul, 2007 1 commit
    • Sam Ravnborg's avatar
      kconfig: attach help text to menus · 03d29122
      Sam Ravnborg authored
      Roman Zippel wrote:
      > A simple example would be
      > help texts, right now they are per symbol, but they should really be per
      > menu, so archs can provide different help texts for something.
      
      This patch does this and at the same time introduce a few API
      funtions used to access the help text.
      
      The relevant api functions are introduced in the various frontends.
      Signed-off-by: default avatarSam Ravnborg <sam@ravnborg.org>
      Cc: Roman Zippel <zippel@linux-m68k.org>
      03d29122
  17. 13 Dec, 2006 3 commits
  18. 09 Jun, 2006 3 commits
  19. 09 Nov, 2005 1 commit
  20. 16 Apr, 2005 1 commit
    • Linus Torvalds's avatar
      Linux-2.6.12-rc2 · 1da177e4
      Linus Torvalds authored
      Initial git repository build. I'm not bothering with the full history,
      even though we have it. We can create a separate "historical" git
      archive of that later if we want to, and in the meantime it's about
      3.2GB when imported into git - space that would just make the early
      git days unnecessarily complicated, when we don't have a lot of good
      infrastructure for it.
      
      Let it rip!
      1da177e4