1. 02 Mar, 2017 1 commit
  2. 29 Nov, 2016 1 commit
  3. 31 Aug, 2016 1 commit
  4. 21 Sep, 2015 1 commit
  5. 01 Jun, 2015 1 commit
  6. 16 Oct, 2013 1 commit
  7. 15 Oct, 2010 1 commit
    • Arnd Bergmann's avatar
      llseek: automatically add .llseek fop · 6038f373
      Arnd Bergmann authored
      All file_operations should get a .llseek operation so we can make
      nonseekable_open the default for future file operations without a
      .llseek pointer.
      
      The three cases that we can automatically detect are no_llseek, seq_lseek
      and default_llseek. For cases where we can we can automatically prove that
      the file offset is always ignored, we use noop_llseek, which maintains
      the current behavior of not returning an error from a seek.
      
      New drivers should normally not use noop_llseek but instead use no_llseek
      and call nonseekable_open at open time.  Existing drivers can be converted
      to do the same when the maintainer knows for certain that no user code
      relies on calling seek on the device file.
      
      The generated code is often incorrectly indented and right now contains
      comments that clarify for each added line why a specific variant was
      chosen. In the version that gets submitted upstream, the comments will
      be gone and I will manually fix the indentation, because there does not
      seem to be a way to do that using coccinelle.
      
      Some amount of new code is currently sitting in linux-next that should get
      the same modifications, which I will do at the end of the merge window.
      
      Many thanks to Julia Lawall for helping me learn to write a semantic
      patch that does all this.
      
      ===== begin semantic patch =====
      // This adds an llseek= method to all file operations,
      // as a preparation for making no_llseek the default.
      //
      // The rules are
      // - use no_llseek explicitly if we do nonseekable_open
      // - use seq_lseek for sequential files
      // - use default_llseek if we know we access f_pos
      // - use noop_llseek if we know we don't access f_pos,
      //   but we still want to allow users to call lseek
      //
      @ open1 exists @
      identifier nested_open;
      @@
      nested_open(...)
      {
      <+...
      nonseekable_open(...)
      ...+>
      }
      
      @ open exists@
      identifier open_f;
      identifier i, f;
      identifier open1.nested_open;
      @@
      int open_f(struct inode *i, struct file *f)
      {
      <+...
      (
      nonseekable_open(...)
      |
      nested_open(...)
      )
      ...+>
      }
      
      @ read disable optional_qualifier exists @
      identifier read_f;
      identifier f, p, s, off;
      type ssize_t, size_t, loff_t;
      expression E;
      identifier func;
      @@
      ssize_t read_f(struct file *f, char *p, size_t s, loff_t *off)
      {
      <+...
      (
         *off = E
      |
         *off += E
      |
         func(..., off, ...)
      |
         E = *off
      )
      ...+>
      }
      
      @ read_no_fpos disable optional_qualifier exists @
      identifier read_f;
      identifier f, p, s, off;
      type ssize_t, size_t, loff_t;
      @@
      ssize_t read_f(struct file *f, char *p, size_t s, loff_t *off)
      {
      ... when != off
      }
      
      @ write @
      identifier write_f;
      identifier f, p, s, off;
      type ssize_t, size_t, loff_t;
      expression E;
      identifier func;
      @@
      ssize_t write_f(struct file *f, const char *p, size_t s, loff_t *off)
      {
      <+...
      (
        *off = E
      |
        *off += E
      |
        func(..., off, ...)
      |
        E = *off
      )
      ...+>
      }
      
      @ write_no_fpos @
      identifier write_f;
      identifier f, p, s, off;
      type ssize_t, size_t, loff_t;
      @@
      ssize_t write_f(struct file *f, const char *p, size_t s, loff_t *off)
      {
      ... when != off
      }
      
      @ fops0 @
      identifier fops;
      @@
      struct file_operations fops = {
       ...
      };
      
      @ has_llseek depends on fops0 @
      identifier fops0.fops;
      identifier llseek_f;
      @@
      struct file_operations fops = {
      ...
       .llseek = llseek_f,
      ...
      };
      
      @ has_read depends on fops0 @
      identifier fops0.fops;
      identifier read_f;
      @@
      struct file_operations fops = {
      ...
       .read = read_f,
      ...
      };
      
      @ has_write depends on fops0 @
      identifier fops0.fops;
      identifier write_f;
      @@
      struct file_operations fops = {
      ...
       .write = write_f,
      ...
      };
      
      @ has_open depends on fops0 @
      identifier fops0.fops;
      identifier open_f;
      @@
      struct file_operations fops = {
      ...
       .open = open_f,
      ...
      };
      
      // use no_llseek if we call nonseekable_open
      ////////////////////////////////////////////
      @ nonseekable1 depends on !has_llseek && has_open @
      identifier fops0.fops;
      identifier nso ~= "nonseekable_open";
      @@
      struct file_operations fops = {
      ...  .open = nso, ...
      +.llseek = no_llseek, /* nonseekable */
      };
      
      @ nonseekable2 depends on !has_llseek @
      identifier fops0.fops;
      identifier open.open_f;
      @@
      struct file_operations fops = {
      ...  .open = open_f, ...
      +.llseek = no_llseek, /* open uses nonseekable */
      };
      
      // use seq_lseek for sequential files
      /////////////////////////////////////
      @ seq depends on !has_llseek @
      identifier fops0.fops;
      identifier sr ~= "seq_read";
      @@
      struct file_operations fops = {
      ...  .read = sr, ...
      +.llseek = seq_lseek, /* we have seq_read */
      };
      
      // use default_llseek if there is a readdir
      ///////////////////////////////////////////
      @ fops1 depends on !has_llseek && !nonseekable1 && !nonseekable2 && !seq @
      identifier fops0.fops;
      identifier readdir_e;
      @@
      // any other fop is used that changes pos
      struct file_operations fops = {
      ... .readdir = readdir_e, ...
      +.llseek = default_llseek, /* readdir is present */
      };
      
      // use default_llseek if at least one of read/write touches f_pos
      /////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////
      @ fops2 depends on !fops1 && !has_llseek && !nonseekable1 && !nonseekable2 && !seq @
      identifier fops0.fops;
      identifier read.read_f;
      @@
      // read fops use offset
      struct file_operations fops = {
      ... .read = read_f, ...
      +.llseek = default_llseek, /* read accesses f_pos */
      };
      
      @ fops3 depends on !fops1 && !fops2 && !has_llseek && !nonseekable1 && !nonseekable2 && !seq @
      identifier fops0.fops;
      identifier write.write_f;
      @@
      // write fops use offset
      struct file_operations fops = {
      ... .write = write_f, ...
      +	.llseek = default_llseek, /* write accesses f_pos */
      };
      
      // Use noop_llseek if neither read nor write accesses f_pos
      ///////////////////////////////////////////////////////////
      
      @ fops4 depends on !fops1 && !fops2 && !fops3 && !has_llseek && !nonseekable1 && !nonseekable2 && !seq @
      identifier fops0.fops;
      identifier read_no_fpos.read_f;
      identifier write_no_fpos.write_f;
      @@
      // write fops use offset
      struct file_operations fops = {
      ...
       .write = write_f,
       .read = read_f,
      ...
      +.llseek = noop_llseek, /* read and write both use no f_pos */
      };
      
      @ depends on has_write && !has_read && !fops1 && !fops2 && !has_llseek && !nonseekable1 && !nonseekable2 && !seq @
      identifier fops0.fops;
      identifier write_no_fpos.write_f;
      @@
      struct file_operations fops = {
      ... .write = write_f, ...
      +.llseek = noop_llseek, /* write uses no f_pos */
      };
      
      @ depends on has_read && !has_write && !fops1 && !fops2 && !has_llseek && !nonseekable1 && !nonseekable2 && !seq @
      identifier fops0.fops;
      identifier read_no_fpos.read_f;
      @@
      struct file_operations fops = {
      ... .read = read_f, ...
      +.llseek = noop_llseek, /* read uses no f_pos */
      };
      
      @ depends on !has_read && !has_write && !fops1 && !fops2 && !has_llseek && !nonseekable1 && !nonseekable2 && !seq @
      identifier fops0.fops;
      @@
      struct file_operations fops = {
      ...
      +.llseek = noop_llseek, /* no read or write fn */
      };
      ===== End semantic patch =====
      Signed-off-by: default avatarArnd Bergmann <arnd@arndb.de>
      Cc: Julia Lawall <julia@diku.dk>
      Cc: Christoph Hellwig <hch@infradead.org>
      6038f373
  8. 05 Oct, 2010 1 commit
    • Arnd Bergmann's avatar
      drivers: autoconvert trivial BKL users to private mutex · 613655fa
      Arnd Bergmann authored
      All these files use the big kernel lock in a trivial
      way to serialize their private file operations,
      typically resulting from an earlier semi-automatic
      pushdown from VFS.
      
      None of these drivers appears to want to lock against
      other code, and they all use the BKL as the top-level
      lock in their file operations, meaning that there
      is no lock-order inversion problem.
      
      Consequently, we can remove the BKL completely,
      replacing it with a per-file mutex in every case.
      Using a scripted approach means we can avoid
      typos.
      
      These drivers do not seem to be under active
      maintainance from my brief investigation. Apologies
      to those maintainers that I have missed.
      
      file=$1
      name=$2
      if grep -q lock_kernel ${file} ; then
          if grep -q 'include.*linux.mutex.h' ${file} ; then
                  sed -i '/include.*<linux\/smp_lock.h>/d' ${file}
          else
                  sed -i 's/include.*<linux\/smp_lock.h>.*$/include <linux\/mutex.h>/g' ${file}
          fi
          sed -i ${file} \
              -e "/^#include.*linux.mutex.h/,$ {
                      1,/^\(static\|int\|long\)/ {
                           /^\(static\|int\|long\)/istatic DEFINE_MUTEX(${name}_mutex);
      
      } }"  \
          -e "s/\(un\)*lock_kernel\>[ ]*()/mutex_\1lock(\&${name}_mutex)/g" \
          -e '/[      ]*cycle_kernel_lock();/d'
      else
          sed -i -e '/include.*\<smp_lock.h\>/d' ${file}  \
                      -e '/cycle_kernel_lock()/d'
      fi
      Signed-off-by: default avatarArnd Bergmann <arnd@arndb.de>
      613655fa
  9. 16 Oct, 2008 1 commit
  10. 22 Jul, 2008 1 commit
  11. 20 Jun, 2008 1 commit
  12. 30 Apr, 2008 1 commit
  13. 12 Oct, 2007 1 commit
  14. 05 Oct, 2006 1 commit
    • David Howells's avatar
      IRQ: Maintain regs pointer globally rather than passing to IRQ handlers · 7d12e780
      David Howells authored
      Maintain a per-CPU global "struct pt_regs *" variable which can be used instead
      of passing regs around manually through all ~1800 interrupt handlers in the
      Linux kernel.
      
      The regs pointer is used in few places, but it potentially costs both stack
      space and code to pass it around.  On the FRV arch, removing the regs parameter
      from all the genirq function results in a 20% speed up of the IRQ exit path
      (ie: from leaving timer_interrupt() to leaving do_IRQ()).
      
      Where appropriate, an arch may override the generic storage facility and do
      something different with the variable.  On FRV, for instance, the address is
      maintained in GR28 at all times inside the kernel as part of general exception
      handling.
      
      Having looked over the code, it appears that the parameter may be handed down
      through up to twenty or so layers of functions.  Consider a USB character
      device attached to a USB hub, attached to a USB controller that posts its
      interrupts through a cascaded auxiliary interrupt controller.  A character
      device driver may want to pass regs to the sysrq handler through the input
      layer which adds another few layers of parameter passing.
      
      I've build this code with allyesconfig for x86_64 and i386.  I've runtested the
      main part of the code on FRV and i386, though I can't test most of the drivers.
      I've also done partial conversion for powerpc and MIPS - these at least compile
      with minimal configurations.
      
      This will affect all archs.  Mostly the changes should be relatively easy.
      Take do_IRQ(), store the regs pointer at the beginning, saving the old one:
      
      	struct pt_regs *old_regs = set_irq_regs(regs);
      
      And put the old one back at the end:
      
      	set_irq_regs(old_regs);
      
      Don't pass regs through to generic_handle_irq() or __do_IRQ().
      
      In timer_interrupt(), this sort of change will be necessary:
      
      	-	update_process_times(user_mode(regs));
      	-	profile_tick(CPU_PROFILING, regs);
      	+	update_process_times(user_mode(get_irq_regs()));
      	+	profile_tick(CPU_PROFILING);
      
      I'd like to move update_process_times()'s use of get_irq_regs() into itself,
      except that i386, alone of the archs, uses something other than user_mode().
      
      Some notes on the interrupt handling in the drivers:
      
       (*) input_dev() is now gone entirely.  The regs pointer is no longer stored in
           the input_dev struct.
      
       (*) finish_unlinks() in drivers/usb/host/ohci-q.c needs checking.  It does
           something different depending on whether it's been supplied with a regs
           pointer or not.
      
       (*) Various IRQ handler function pointers have been moved to type
           irq_handler_t.
      Signed-Off-By: default avatarDavid Howells <dhowells@redhat.com>
      (cherry picked from 1b16e7ac850969f38b375e511e3fa2f474a33867 commit)
      7d12e780
  15. 02 Aug, 2006 1 commit
  16. 03 Jul, 2006 1 commit
  17. 02 Jul, 2006 1 commit
  18. 22 Apr, 2006 1 commit
  19. 23 Mar, 2006 1 commit
  20. 28 Oct, 2005 1 commit
  21. 15 Sep, 2005 1 commit
    • Jack Steiner's avatar
      [IA64] Cleanup use of various #defines related to nodes · 24ee0a6d
      Jack Steiner authored
      Some of the SN code & #defines related to compact nodes & IO discovery
      have gotten stale over the years. This patch attempts to clean them up.
      Some of the various SN MAX_xxx #defines were also unclear & misused.
      
      The primary changes are:
      
      	- use MAX_NUMNODES. This is the generic linux #define for the number
      	  of nodes that are known to the generic kernel. Arrays & loops
      	  for constructs that are 1:1 with linux-defined nodes should
      	  use the linux #define - not an SN equivalent.
      
      	- use MAX_COMPACT_NODES for MAX_NUMNODES + NUM_TIOS. This is the
      	  number of nodes in the SSI system. Compact nodes are a hack to
      	  get around the IA64 architectural limit of 256 nodes. Large SGI
      	  systems have more than 256 nodes. When we upgrade to ACPI3.0,
      	  I _hope_ that all nodes will be real nodes that are known to
      	  the generic kernel. That will allow us to delete the notion
      	  of "compact nodes".
      
      	- add MAX_NUMALINK_NODES for the total number of nodes that
      	  are in the numalink domain - all partitions.
      
      	- simplified (understandable) scan_for_ionodes()
      
      	- small amount of cleanup related to cnodes
      Signed-off-by: default avatarJack Steiner <steiner@sgi.com>
      Signed-off-by: default avatarTony Luck <tony.luck@intel.com>
      24ee0a6d
  22. 20 Jun, 2005 2 commits
  23. 25 Apr, 2005 1 commit
    • Greg Howard's avatar
      [IA64] Altix system controller event handling · 67639deb
      Greg Howard authored
      The following is an update of the patch I sent yesterday
      (3/9/05) incorporating suggestions from Christoph Hellwig and
      Andreas Schwab.  It allows Altix and Altix-like systems to
      handle environmental events generated by the system controllers,
      and should apply on top of Jack Steiner's patch of 3/1/05 ("New
      chipset support for SN platform") and Mark Goodwin's patch of
      3/8/05 ("Altix SN topology support for new chipsets and pci
      topology").
      Signed-off-by: default avatarGreg Howard <ghoward@sgi.com>
      Signed-off-by: default avatarTony Luck <tony.luck@intel.com>
      67639deb
  24. 16 Apr, 2005 1 commit
    • Linus Torvalds's avatar
      Linux-2.6.12-rc2 · 1da177e4
      Linus Torvalds authored
      Initial git repository build. I'm not bothering with the full history,
      even though we have it. We can create a separate "historical" git
      archive of that later if we want to, and in the meantime it's about
      3.2GB when imported into git - space that would just make the early
      git days unnecessarily complicated, when we don't have a lot of good
      infrastructure for it.
      
      Let it rip!
      1da177e4