1. 08 Jun, 2017 1 commit
  2. 27 Apr, 2017 1 commit
  3. 19 Jan, 2017 1 commit
  4. 29 Sep, 2016 1 commit
  5. 28 Sep, 2016 1 commit
  6. 29 May, 2016 2 commits
  7. 22 Jan, 2016 1 commit
    • Al Viro's avatar
      wrappers for ->i_mutex access · 5955102c
      Al Viro authored
      parallel to mutex_{lock,unlock,trylock,is_locked,lock_nested},
      inode_foo(inode) being mutex_foo(&inode->i_mutex).
      
      Please, use those for access to ->i_mutex; over the coming cycle
      ->i_mutex will become rwsem, with ->lookup() done with it held
      only shared.
      Signed-off-by: default avatarAl Viro <viro@zeniv.linux.org.uk>
      5955102c
  8. 01 Jul, 2015 1 commit
  9. 23 Jun, 2015 1 commit
  10. 15 Apr, 2015 1 commit
  11. 22 Feb, 2015 1 commit
    • David Howells's avatar
      VFS: (Scripted) Convert S_ISLNK/DIR/REG(dentry->d_inode) to d_is_*(dentry) · e36cb0b8
      David Howells authored
      Convert the following where appropriate:
      
       (1) S_ISLNK(dentry->d_inode) to d_is_symlink(dentry).
      
       (2) S_ISREG(dentry->d_inode) to d_is_reg(dentry).
      
       (3) S_ISDIR(dentry->d_inode) to d_is_dir(dentry).  This is actually more
           complicated than it appears as some calls should be converted to
           d_can_lookup() instead.  The difference is whether the directory in
           question is a real dir with a ->lookup op or whether it's a fake dir with
           a ->d_automount op.
      
      In some circumstances, we can subsume checks for dentry->d_inode not being
      NULL into this, provided we the code isn't in a filesystem that expects
      d_inode to be NULL if the dirent really *is* negative (ie. if we're going to
      use d_inode() rather than d_backing_inode() to get the inode pointer).
      
      Note that the dentry type field may be set to something other than
      DCACHE_MISS_TYPE when d_inode is NULL in the case of unionmount, where the VFS
      manages the fall-through from a negative dentry to a lower layer.  In such a
      case, the dentry type of the negative union dentry is set to the same as the
      type of the lower dentry.
      
      However, if you know d_inode is not NULL at the call site, then you can use
      the d_is_xxx() functions even in a filesystem.
      
      There is one further complication: a 0,0 chardev dentry may be labelled
      DCACHE_WHITEOUT_TYPE rather than DCACHE_SPECIAL_TYPE.  Strictly, this was
      intended for special directory entry types that don't have attached inodes.
      
      The following perl+coccinelle script was used:
      
      use strict;
      
      my @callers;
      open($fd, 'git grep -l \'S_IS[A-Z].*->d_inode\' |') ||
          die "Can't grep for S_ISDIR and co. callers";
      @callers = <$fd>;
      close($fd);
      unless (@callers) {
          print "No matches\n";
          exit(0);
      }
      
      my @cocci = (
          '@@',
          'expression E;',
          '@@',
          '',
          '- S_ISLNK(E->d_inode->i_mode)',
          '+ d_is_symlink(E)',
          '',
          '@@',
          'expression E;',
          '@@',
          '',
          '- S_ISDIR(E->d_inode->i_mode)',
          '+ d_is_dir(E)',
          '',
          '@@',
          'expression E;',
          '@@',
          '',
          '- S_ISREG(E->d_inode->i_mode)',
          '+ d_is_reg(E)' );
      
      my $coccifile = "tmp.sp.cocci";
      open($fd, ">$coccifile") || die $coccifile;
      print($fd "$_\n") || die $coccifile foreach (@cocci);
      close($fd);
      
      foreach my $file (@callers) {
          chomp $file;
          print "Processing ", $file, "\n";
          system("spatch", "--sp-file", $coccifile, $file, "--in-place", "--no-show-diff") == 0 ||
      	die "spatch failed";
      }
      
      [AV: overlayfs parts skipped]
      Signed-off-by: default avatarDavid Howells <dhowells@redhat.com>
      Signed-off-by: default avatarAl Viro <viro@zeniv.linux.org.uk>
      e36cb0b8
  12. 09 Sep, 2014 1 commit
  13. 10 Jan, 2012 1 commit
    • Al Viro's avatar
      securityfs: fix object creation races · 3e25eb9c
      Al Viro authored
      inode needs to be fully set up before we feed it to d_instantiate().
      securityfs_create_file() does *not* do so; it sets ->i_fop and
      ->i_private only after we'd exposed the inode.  Unfortunately,
      that's done fairly deep in call chain, so the amount of churn
      is considerable.  Helper functions killed by substituting into
      their solitary call sites, dead code removed.  We finally can
      bury default_file_ops, now that the final value of ->i_fop is
      available (and assigned) at the point where inode is allocated.
      Reviewed-by: default avatarJames Morris <jmorris@namei.org>
      Signed-off-by: default avatarAl Viro <viro@zeniv.linux.org.uk>
      3e25eb9c
  14. 04 Jan, 2012 3 commits
  15. 29 Oct, 2010 1 commit
  16. 26 Oct, 2010 1 commit
    • Christoph Hellwig's avatar
      fs: do not assign default i_ino in new_inode · 85fe4025
      Christoph Hellwig authored
      Instead of always assigning an increasing inode number in new_inode
      move the call to assign it into those callers that actually need it.
      For now callers that need it is estimated conservatively, that is
      the call is added to all filesystems that do not assign an i_ino
      by themselves.  For a few more filesystems we can avoid assigning
      any inode number given that they aren't user visible, and for others
      it could be done lazily when an inode number is actually needed,
      but that's left for later patches.
      Signed-off-by: default avatarChristoph Hellwig <hch@lst.de>
      Signed-off-by: default avatarDave Chinner <dchinner@redhat.com>
      Signed-off-by: default avatarAl Viro <viro@zeniv.linux.org.uk>
      85fe4025
  17. 15 Oct, 2010 1 commit
    • Arnd Bergmann's avatar
      llseek: automatically add .llseek fop · 6038f373
      Arnd Bergmann authored
      All file_operations should get a .llseek operation so we can make
      nonseekable_open the default for future file operations without a
      .llseek pointer.
      
      The three cases that we can automatically detect are no_llseek, seq_lseek
      and default_llseek. For cases where we can we can automatically prove that
      the file offset is always ignored, we use noop_llseek, which maintains
      the current behavior of not returning an error from a seek.
      
      New drivers should normally not use noop_llseek but instead use no_llseek
      and call nonseekable_open at open time.  Existing drivers can be converted
      to do the same when the maintainer knows for certain that no user code
      relies on calling seek on the device file.
      
      The generated code is often incorrectly indented and right now contains
      comments that clarify for each added line why a specific variant was
      chosen. In the version that gets submitted upstream, the comments will
      be gone and I will manually fix the indentation, because there does not
      seem to be a way to do that using coccinelle.
      
      Some amount of new code is currently sitting in linux-next that should get
      the same modifications, which I will do at the end of the merge window.
      
      Many thanks to Julia Lawall for helping me learn to write a semantic
      patch that does all this.
      
      ===== begin semantic patch =====
      // This adds an llseek= method to all file operations,
      // as a preparation for making no_llseek the default.
      //
      // The rules are
      // - use no_llseek explicitly if we do nonseekable_open
      // - use seq_lseek for sequential files
      // - use default_llseek if we know we access f_pos
      // - use noop_llseek if we know we don't access f_pos,
      //   but we still want to allow users to call lseek
      //
      @ open1 exists @
      identifier nested_open;
      @@
      nested_open(...)
      {
      <+...
      nonseekable_open(...)
      ...+>
      }
      
      @ open exists@
      identifier open_f;
      identifier i, f;
      identifier open1.nested_open;
      @@
      int open_f(struct inode *i, struct file *f)
      {
      <+...
      (
      nonseekable_open(...)
      |
      nested_open(...)
      )
      ...+>
      }
      
      @ read disable optional_qualifier exists @
      identifier read_f;
      identifier f, p, s, off;
      type ssize_t, size_t, loff_t;
      expression E;
      identifier func;
      @@
      ssize_t read_f(struct file *f, char *p, size_t s, loff_t *off)
      {
      <+...
      (
         *off = E
      |
         *off += E
      |
         func(..., off, ...)
      |
         E = *off
      )
      ...+>
      }
      
      @ read_no_fpos disable optional_qualifier exists @
      identifier read_f;
      identifier f, p, s, off;
      type ssize_t, size_t, loff_t;
      @@
      ssize_t read_f(struct file *f, char *p, size_t s, loff_t *off)
      {
      ... when != off
      }
      
      @ write @
      identifier write_f;
      identifier f, p, s, off;
      type ssize_t, size_t, loff_t;
      expression E;
      identifier func;
      @@
      ssize_t write_f(struct file *f, const char *p, size_t s, loff_t *off)
      {
      <+...
      (
        *off = E
      |
        *off += E
      |
        func(..., off, ...)
      |
        E = *off
      )
      ...+>
      }
      
      @ write_no_fpos @
      identifier write_f;
      identifier f, p, s, off;
      type ssize_t, size_t, loff_t;
      @@
      ssize_t write_f(struct file *f, const char *p, size_t s, loff_t *off)
      {
      ... when != off
      }
      
      @ fops0 @
      identifier fops;
      @@
      struct file_operations fops = {
       ...
      };
      
      @ has_llseek depends on fops0 @
      identifier fops0.fops;
      identifier llseek_f;
      @@
      struct file_operations fops = {
      ...
       .llseek = llseek_f,
      ...
      };
      
      @ has_read depends on fops0 @
      identifier fops0.fops;
      identifier read_f;
      @@
      struct file_operations fops = {
      ...
       .read = read_f,
      ...
      };
      
      @ has_write depends on fops0 @
      identifier fops0.fops;
      identifier write_f;
      @@
      struct file_operations fops = {
      ...
       .write = write_f,
      ...
      };
      
      @ has_open depends on fops0 @
      identifier fops0.fops;
      identifier open_f;
      @@
      struct file_operations fops = {
      ...
       .open = open_f,
      ...
      };
      
      // use no_llseek if we call nonseekable_open
      ////////////////////////////////////////////
      @ nonseekable1 depends on !has_llseek && has_open @
      identifier fops0.fops;
      identifier nso ~= "nonseekable_open";
      @@
      struct file_operations fops = {
      ...  .open = nso, ...
      +.llseek = no_llseek, /* nonseekable */
      };
      
      @ nonseekable2 depends on !has_llseek @
      identifier fops0.fops;
      identifier open.open_f;
      @@
      struct file_operations fops = {
      ...  .open = open_f, ...
      +.llseek = no_llseek, /* open uses nonseekable */
      };
      
      // use seq_lseek for sequential files
      /////////////////////////////////////
      @ seq depends on !has_llseek @
      identifier fops0.fops;
      identifier sr ~= "seq_read";
      @@
      struct file_operations fops = {
      ...  .read = sr, ...
      +.llseek = seq_lseek, /* we have seq_read */
      };
      
      // use default_llseek if there is a readdir
      ///////////////////////////////////////////
      @ fops1 depends on !has_llseek && !nonseekable1 && !nonseekable2 && !seq @
      identifier fops0.fops;
      identifier readdir_e;
      @@
      // any other fop is used that changes pos
      struct file_operations fops = {
      ... .readdir = readdir_e, ...
      +.llseek = default_llseek, /* readdir is present */
      };
      
      // use default_llseek if at least one of read/write touches f_pos
      /////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////
      @ fops2 depends on !fops1 && !has_llseek && !nonseekable1 && !nonseekable2 && !seq @
      identifier fops0.fops;
      identifier read.read_f;
      @@
      // read fops use offset
      struct file_operations fops = {
      ... .read = read_f, ...
      +.llseek = default_llseek, /* read accesses f_pos */
      };
      
      @ fops3 depends on !fops1 && !fops2 && !has_llseek && !nonseekable1 && !nonseekable2 && !seq @
      identifier fops0.fops;
      identifier write.write_f;
      @@
      // write fops use offset
      struct file_operations fops = {
      ... .write = write_f, ...
      +	.llseek = default_llseek, /* write accesses f_pos */
      };
      
      // Use noop_llseek if neither read nor write accesses f_pos
      ///////////////////////////////////////////////////////////
      
      @ fops4 depends on !fops1 && !fops2 && !fops3 && !has_llseek && !nonseekable1 && !nonseekable2 && !seq @
      identifier fops0.fops;
      identifier read_no_fpos.read_f;
      identifier write_no_fpos.write_f;
      @@
      // write fops use offset
      struct file_operations fops = {
      ...
       .write = write_f,
       .read = read_f,
      ...
      +.llseek = noop_llseek, /* read and write both use no f_pos */
      };
      
      @ depends on has_write && !has_read && !fops1 && !fops2 && !has_llseek && !nonseekable1 && !nonseekable2 && !seq @
      identifier fops0.fops;
      identifier write_no_fpos.write_f;
      @@
      struct file_operations fops = {
      ... .write = write_f, ...
      +.llseek = noop_llseek, /* write uses no f_pos */
      };
      
      @ depends on has_read && !has_write && !fops1 && !fops2 && !has_llseek && !nonseekable1 && !nonseekable2 && !seq @
      identifier fops0.fops;
      identifier read_no_fpos.read_f;
      @@
      struct file_operations fops = {
      ... .read = read_f, ...
      +.llseek = noop_llseek, /* read uses no f_pos */
      };
      
      @ depends on !has_read && !has_write && !fops1 && !fops2 && !has_llseek && !nonseekable1 && !nonseekable2 && !seq @
      identifier fops0.fops;
      @@
      struct file_operations fops = {
      ...
      +.llseek = noop_llseek, /* no read or write fn */
      };
      ===== End semantic patch =====
      Signed-off-by: default avatarArnd Bergmann <arnd@arndb.de>
      Cc: Julia Lawall <julia@diku.dk>
      Cc: Christoph Hellwig <hch@infradead.org>
      6038f373
  18. 02 Aug, 2010 1 commit
  19. 22 Apr, 2010 1 commit
  20. 27 Jan, 2010 1 commit
  21. 12 May, 2009 1 commit
  22. 03 Feb, 2009 1 commit
  23. 05 Jan, 2009 1 commit
  24. 12 Oct, 2008 1 commit
  25. 20 Aug, 2008 1 commit
  26. 25 Jan, 2008 5 commits
  27. 17 Oct, 2007 1 commit
  28. 03 May, 2007 1 commit
  29. 12 Feb, 2007 1 commit
  30. 01 Oct, 2006 1 commit
  31. 27 Sep, 2006 2 commits
    • Theodore Ts'o's avatar
      [PATCH] inode-diet: Eliminate i_blksize from the inode structure · ba52de12
      Theodore Ts'o authored
      This eliminates the i_blksize field from struct inode.  Filesystems that want
      to provide a per-inode st_blksize can do so by providing their own getattr
      routine instead of using the generic_fillattr() function.
      
      Note that some filesystems were providing pretty much random (and incorrect)
      values for i_blksize.
      
      [bunk@stusta.de: cleanup]
      [akpm@osdl.org: generic_fillattr() fix]
      Signed-off-by: default avatar"Theodore Ts'o" <tytso@mit.edu>
      Signed-off-by: default avatarAdrian Bunk <bunk@stusta.de>
      Signed-off-by: default avatarAndrew Morton <akpm@osdl.org>
      Signed-off-by: default avatarLinus Torvalds <torvalds@osdl.org>
      ba52de12
    • Theodore Ts'o's avatar
      [PATCH] inode_diet: Replace inode.u.generic_ip with inode.i_private · 8e18e294
      Theodore Ts'o authored
      The following patches reduce the size of the VFS inode structure by 28 bytes
      on a UP x86.  (It would be more on an x86_64 system).  This is a 10% reduction
      in the inode size on a UP kernel that is configured in a production mode
      (i.e., with no spinlock or other debugging functions enabled; if you want to
      save memory taken up by in-core inodes, the first thing you should do is
      disable the debugging options; they are responsible for a huge amount of bloat
      in the VFS inode structure).
      
      This patch:
      
      The filesystem or device-specific pointer in the inode is inside a union,
      which is pretty pointless given that all 30+ users of this field have been
      using the void pointer.  Get rid of the union and rename it to i_private, with
      a comment to explain who is allowed to use the void pointer.  This is just a
      cleanup, but it allows us to reuse the union 'u' for something something where
      the union will actually be used.
      
      [judith@osdl.org: powerpc build fix]
      Signed-off-by: default avatar"Theodore Ts'o" <tytso@mit.edu>
      Signed-off-by: default avatarJudith Lebzelter <judith@osdl.org>
      Signed-off-by: default avatarAndrew Morton <akpm@osdl.org>
      Signed-off-by: default avatarLinus Torvalds <torvalds@osdl.org>
      8e18e294
  32. 30 Jun, 2006 1 commit