Commit ff5f149b authored by Steven Rostedt's avatar Steven Rostedt Committed by Steven Rostedt

Merge branch 'perf/core' of...

Merge branch 'perf/core' of git://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/tip/linux-2.6-tip into trace/tip/tracing/core-7

Conflicts:
	include/linux/ftrace_event.h
	include/trace/ftrace.h
	kernel/trace/trace_event_perf.c
	kernel/trace/trace_kprobe.c
	kernel/trace/trace_syscalls.c
Signed-off-by: default avatarSteven Rostedt <rostedt@goodmis.org>
parents f0218b3e 580d607c
......@@ -3,35 +3,79 @@ Using RCU's CPU Stall Detector
The CONFIG_RCU_CPU_STALL_DETECTOR kernel config parameter enables
RCU's CPU stall detector, which detects conditions that unduly delay
RCU grace periods. The stall detector's idea of what constitutes
"unduly delayed" is controlled by a pair of C preprocessor macros:
"unduly delayed" is controlled by a set of C preprocessor macros:
RCU_SECONDS_TILL_STALL_CHECK
This macro defines the period of time that RCU will wait from
the beginning of a grace period until it issues an RCU CPU
stall warning. It is normally ten seconds.
stall warning. This time period is normally ten seconds.
RCU_SECONDS_TILL_STALL_RECHECK
This macro defines the period of time that RCU will wait after
issuing a stall warning until it issues another stall warning.
It is normally set to thirty seconds.
issuing a stall warning until it issues another stall warning
for the same stall. This time period is normally set to thirty
seconds.
RCU_STALL_RAT_DELAY
The CPU stall detector tries to make the offending CPU rat on itself,
as this often gives better-quality stack traces. However, if
the offending CPU does not detect its own stall in the number
of jiffies specified by RCU_STALL_RAT_DELAY, then other CPUs will
complain. This is normally set to two jiffies.
The CPU stall detector tries to make the offending CPU print its
own warnings, as this often gives better-quality stack traces.
However, if the offending CPU does not detect its own stall in
the number of jiffies specified by RCU_STALL_RAT_DELAY, then
some other CPU will complain. This delay is normally set to
two jiffies.
The following problems can result in an RCU CPU stall warning:
When a CPU detects that it is stalling, it will print a message similar
to the following:
INFO: rcu_sched_state detected stall on CPU 5 (t=2500 jiffies)
This message indicates that CPU 5 detected that it was causing a stall,
and that the stall was affecting RCU-sched. This message will normally be
followed by a stack dump of the offending CPU. On TREE_RCU kernel builds,
RCU and RCU-sched are implemented by the same underlying mechanism,
while on TREE_PREEMPT_RCU kernel builds, RCU is instead implemented
by rcu_preempt_state.
On the other hand, if the offending CPU fails to print out a stall-warning
message quickly enough, some other CPU will print a message similar to
the following:
INFO: rcu_bh_state detected stalls on CPUs/tasks: { 3 5 } (detected by 2, 2502 jiffies)
This message indicates that CPU 2 detected that CPUs 3 and 5 were both
causing stalls, and that the stall was affecting RCU-bh. This message
will normally be followed by stack dumps for each CPU. Please note that
TREE_PREEMPT_RCU builds can be stalled by tasks as well as by CPUs,
and that the tasks will be indicated by PID, for example, "P3421".
It is even possible for a rcu_preempt_state stall to be caused by both
CPUs -and- tasks, in which case the offending CPUs and tasks will all
be called out in the list.
Finally, if the grace period ends just as the stall warning starts
printing, there will be a spurious stall-warning message:
INFO: rcu_bh_state detected stalls on CPUs/tasks: { } (detected by 4, 2502 jiffies)
This is rare, but does happen from time to time in real life.
So your kernel printed an RCU CPU stall warning. The next question is
"What caused it?" The following problems can result in RCU CPU stall
warnings:
o A CPU looping in an RCU read-side critical section.
o A CPU looping with interrupts disabled.
o A CPU looping with interrupts disabled. This condition can
result in RCU-sched and RCU-bh stalls.
o A CPU looping with preemption disabled.
o A CPU looping with preemption disabled. This condition can
result in RCU-sched stalls and, if ksoftirqd is in use, RCU-bh
stalls.
o A CPU looping with bottom halves disabled. This condition can
result in RCU-sched and RCU-bh stalls.
o For !CONFIG_PREEMPT kernels, a CPU looping anywhere in the kernel
without invoking schedule().
......@@ -39,20 +83,24 @@ o For !CONFIG_PREEMPT kernels, a CPU looping anywhere in the kernel
o A bug in the RCU implementation.
o A hardware failure. This is quite unlikely, but has occurred
at least once in a former life. A CPU failed in a running system,
at least once in real life. A CPU failed in a running system,
becoming unresponsive, but not causing an immediate crash.
This resulted in a series of RCU CPU stall warnings, eventually
leading the realization that the CPU had failed.
The RCU, RCU-sched, and RCU-bh implementations have CPU stall warning.
SRCU does not do so directly, but its calls to synchronize_sched() will
result in RCU-sched detecting any CPU stalls that might be occurring.
To diagnose the cause of the stall, inspect the stack traces. The offending
function will usually be near the top of the stack. If you have a series
of stall warnings from a single extended stall, comparing the stack traces
can often help determine where the stall is occurring, which will usually
be in the function nearest the top of the stack that stays the same from
trace to trace.
The RCU, RCU-sched, and RCU-bh implementations have CPU stall
warning. SRCU does not have its own CPU stall warnings, but its
calls to synchronize_sched() will result in RCU-sched detecting
RCU-sched-related CPU stalls. Please note that RCU only detects
CPU stalls when there is a grace period in progress. No grace period,
no CPU stall warnings.
To diagnose the cause of the stall, inspect the stack traces.
The offending function will usually be near the top of the stack.
If you have a series of stall warnings from a single extended stall,
comparing the stack traces can often help determine where the stall
is occurring, which will usually be in the function nearest the top of
that portion of the stack which remains the same from trace to trace.
If you can reliably trigger the stall, ftrace can be quite helpful.
RCU bugs can often be debugged with the help of CONFIG_RCU_TRACE.
......@@ -256,23 +256,23 @@ o Each element of the form "1/1 0:127 ^0" represents one struct
The output of "cat rcu/rcu_pending" looks as follows:
rcu_sched:
0 np=255892 qsp=53936 cbr=0 cng=14417 gpc=10033 gps=24320 nf=6445 nn=146741
1 np=261224 qsp=54638 cbr=0 cng=25723 gpc=16310 gps=2849 nf=5912 nn=155792
2 np=237496 qsp=49664 cbr=0 cng=2762 gpc=45478 gps=1762 nf=1201 nn=136629
3 np=236249 qsp=48766 cbr=0 cng=286 gpc=48049 gps=1218 nf=207 nn=137723
4 np=221310 qsp=46850 cbr=0 cng=26 gpc=43161 gps=4634 nf=3529 nn=123110
5 np=237332 qsp=48449 cbr=0 cng=54 gpc=47920 gps=3252 nf=201 nn=137456
6 np=219995 qsp=46718 cbr=0 cng=50 gpc=42098 gps=6093 nf=4202 nn=120834
7 np=249893 qsp=49390 cbr=0 cng=72 gpc=38400 gps=17102 nf=41 nn=144888
0 np=255892 qsp=53936 rpq=85 cbr=0 cng=14417 gpc=10033 gps=24320 nf=6445 nn=146741
1 np=261224 qsp=54638 rpq=33 cbr=0 cng=25723 gpc=16310 gps=2849 nf=5912 nn=155792
2 np=237496 qsp=49664 rpq=23 cbr=0 cng=2762 gpc=45478 gps=1762 nf=1201 nn=136629
3 np=236249 qsp=48766 rpq=98 cbr=0 cng=286 gpc=48049 gps=1218 nf=207 nn=137723
4 np=221310 qsp=46850 rpq=7 cbr=0 cng=26 gpc=43161 gps=4634 nf=3529 nn=123110
5 np=237332 qsp=48449 rpq=9 cbr=0 cng=54 gpc=47920 gps=3252 nf=201 nn=137456
6 np=219995 qsp=46718 rpq=12 cbr=0 cng=50 gpc=42098 gps=6093 nf=4202 nn=120834
7 np=249893 qsp=49390 rpq=42 cbr=0 cng=72 gpc=38400 gps=17102 nf=41 nn=144888
rcu_bh:
0 np=146741 qsp=1419 cbr=0 cng=6 gpc=0 gps=0 nf=2 nn=145314
1 np=155792 qsp=12597 cbr=0 cng=0 gpc=4 gps=8 nf=3 nn=143180
2 np=136629 qsp=18680 cbr=0 cng=0 gpc=7 gps=6 nf=0 nn=117936
3 np=137723 qsp=2843 cbr=0 cng=0 gpc=10 gps=7 nf=0 nn=134863
4 np=123110 qsp=12433 cbr=0 cng=0 gpc=4 gps=2 nf=0 nn=110671
5 np=137456 qsp=4210 cbr=0 cng=0 gpc=6 gps=5 nf=0 nn=133235
6 np=120834 qsp=9902 cbr=0 cng=0 gpc=6 gps=3 nf=2 nn=110921
7 np=144888 qsp=26336 cbr=0 cng=0 gpc=8 gps=2 nf=0 nn=118542
0 np=146741 qsp=1419 rpq=6 cbr=0 cng=6 gpc=0 gps=0 nf=2 nn=145314
1 np=155792 qsp=12597 rpq=3 cbr=0 cng=0 gpc=4 gps=8 nf=3 nn=143180
2 np=136629 qsp=18680 rpq=1 cbr=0 cng=0 gpc=7 gps=6 nf=0 nn=117936
3 np=137723 qsp=2843 rpq=0 cbr=0 cng=0 gpc=10 gps=7 nf=0 nn=134863
4 np=123110 qsp=12433 rpq=0 cbr=0 cng=0 gpc=4 gps=2 nf=0 nn=110671
5 np=137456 qsp=4210 rpq=1 cbr=0 cng=0 gpc=6 gps=5 nf=0 nn=133235
6 np=120834 qsp=9902 rpq=2 cbr=0 cng=0 gpc=6 gps=3 nf=2 nn=110921
7 np=144888 qsp=26336 rpq=0 cbr=0 cng=0 gpc=8 gps=2 nf=0 nn=118542
As always, this is once again split into "rcu_sched" and "rcu_bh"
portions, with CONFIG_TREE_PREEMPT_RCU kernels having an additional
......@@ -284,6 +284,9 @@ o "np" is the number of times that __rcu_pending() has been invoked
o "qsp" is the number of times that the RCU was waiting for a
quiescent state from this CPU.
o "rpq" is the number of times that the CPU had passed through
a quiescent state, but not yet reported it to RCU.
o "cbr" is the number of times that this CPU had RCU callbacks
that had passed through a grace period, and were thus ready
to be invoked.
......
......@@ -589,3 +589,26 @@ Why: Useful in 2003, implementation is a hack.
Generally invoked by accident today.
Seen as doing more harm than good.
Who: Len Brown <len.brown@intel.com>
----------------------------
What: video4linux /dev/vtx teletext API support
When: 2.6.35
Files: drivers/media/video/saa5246a.c drivers/media/video/saa5249.c
include/linux/videotext.h
Why: The vtx device nodes have been superseded by vbi device nodes
for many years. No applications exist that use the vtx support.
Of the two i2c drivers that actually support this API the saa5249
has been impossible to use for a year now and no known hardware
that supports this device exists. The saa5246a is theoretically
supported by the old mxb boards, but it never actually worked.
In summary: there is no hardware that can use this API and there
are no applications actually implementing this API.
The vtx support still reserves minors 192-223 and we would really
like to reuse those for upcoming new functionality. In the unlikely
event that new hardware appears that wants to use the functionality
provided by the vtx API, then that functionality should be build
around the sliced VBI API instead.
Who: Hans Verkuil <hverkuil@xs4all.nl>
......@@ -316,7 +316,7 @@ address perms offset dev inode pathname
08049000-0804a000 rw-p 00001000 03:00 8312 /opt/test
0804a000-0806b000 rw-p 00000000 00:00 0 [heap]
a7cb1000-a7cb2000 ---p 00000000 00:00 0
a7cb2000-a7eb2000 rw-p 00000000 00:00 0 [threadstack:001ff4b4]
a7cb2000-a7eb2000 rw-p 00000000 00:00 0
a7eb2000-a7eb3000 ---p 00000000 00:00 0
a7eb3000-a7ed5000 rw-p 00000000 00:00 0
a7ed5000-a8008000 r-xp 00000000 03:00 4222 /lib/libc.so.6
......@@ -352,7 +352,6 @@ is not associated with a file:
[stack] = the stack of the main process
[vdso] = the "virtual dynamic shared object",
the kernel system call handler
[threadstack:xxxxxxxx] = the stack of the thread, xxxxxxxx is the stack size
or if empty, the mapping is anonymous.
......
......@@ -161,13 +161,15 @@ o In order to put a system into any of the sleep states after a TXT
has been restored, it will restore the TPM PCRs and then
transfer control back to the kernel's S3 resume vector.
In order to preserve system integrity across S3, the kernel
provides tboot with a set of memory ranges (kernel
code/data/bss, S3 resume code, and AP trampoline) that tboot
will calculate a MAC (message authentication code) over and then
seal with the TPM. On resume and once the measured environment
has been re-established, tboot will re-calculate the MAC and
verify it against the sealed value. Tboot's policy determines
what happens if the verification fails.
provides tboot with a set of memory ranges (RAM and RESERVED_KERN
in the e820 table, but not any memory that BIOS might alter over
the S3 transition) that tboot will calculate a MAC (message
authentication code) over and then seal with the TPM. On resume
and once the measured environment has been re-established, tboot
will re-calculate the MAC and verify it against the sealed value.
Tboot's policy determines what happens if the verification fails.
Note that the c/s 194 of tboot which has the new MAC code supports
this.
That's pretty much it for TXT support.
......
......@@ -324,6 +324,8 @@ and is between 256 and 4096 characters. It is defined in the file
they are unmapped. Otherwise they are
flushed before they will be reused, which
is a lot of faster
off - do not initialize any AMD IOMMU found in
the system
amijoy.map= [HW,JOY] Amiga joystick support
Map of devices attached to JOY0DAT and JOY1DAT
......
......@@ -190,3 +190,61 @@ Example:
for (node = rb_first(&mytree); node; node = rb_next(node))
printk("key=%s\n", rb_entry(node, struct mytype, node)->keystring);
Support for Augmented rbtrees
-----------------------------
Augmented rbtree is an rbtree with "some" additional data stored in each node.
This data can be used to augment some new functionality to rbtree.
Augmented rbtree is an optional feature built on top of basic rbtree
infrastructure. rbtree user who wants this feature will have an augment
callback function in rb_root initialized.
This callback function will be called from rbtree core routines whenever
a node has a change in one or both of its children. It is the responsibility
of the callback function to recalculate the additional data that is in the
rb node using new children information. Note that if this new additional
data affects the parent node's additional data, then callback function has
to handle it and do the recursive updates.
Interval tree is an example of augmented rb tree. Reference -
"Introduction to Algorithms" by Cormen, Leiserson, Rivest and Stein.
More details about interval trees:
Classical rbtree has a single key and it cannot be directly used to store
interval ranges like [lo:hi] and do a quick lookup for any overlap with a new
lo:hi or to find whether there is an exact match for a new lo:hi.
However, rbtree can be augmented to store such interval ranges in a structured
way making it possible to do efficient lookup and exact match.
This "extra information" stored in each node is the maximum hi
(max_hi) value among all the nodes that are its descendents. This
information can be maintained at each node just be looking at the node
and its immediate children. And this will be used in O(log n) lookup
for lowest match (lowest start address among all possible matches)
with something like:
find_lowest_match(lo, hi, node)
{
lowest_match = NULL;
while (node) {
if (max_hi(node->left) > lo) {
// Lowest overlap if any must be on left side
node = node->left;
} else if (overlap(lo, hi, node)) {
lowest_match = node;
break;
} else if (lo > node->lo) {
// Lowest overlap if any must be on right side
node = node->right;
} else {
break;
}
}
return lowest_match;
}
Finding exact match will be to first find lowest match and then to follow
successor nodes looking for exact match, until the start of a node is beyond
the hi value we are looking for.
......@@ -2953,6 +2953,17 @@ S: Odd Fixes
F: Documentation/networking/README.ipw2200
F: drivers/net/wireless/ipw2x00/ipw2200.*
INTEL(R) TRUSTED EXECUTION TECHNOLOGY (TXT)
M: Joseph Cihula <joseph.cihula@intel.com>
M: Shane Wang <shane.wang@intel.com>
L: tboot-devel@lists.sourceforge.net
W: http://tboot.sourceforge.net
T: Mercurial http://www.bughost.org/repos.hg/tboot.hg
S: Supported
F: Documentation/intel_txt.txt
F: include/linux/tboot.h
F: arch/x86/kernel/tboot.c
INTEL WIRELESS WIMAX CONNECTION 2400
M: Inaky Perez-Gonzalez <inaky.perez-gonzalez@intel.com>
M: linux-wimax@intel.com
......@@ -4165,6 +4176,7 @@ OPROFILE
M: Robert Richter <robert.richter@amd.com>
L: oprofile-list@lists.sf.net
S: Maintained
F: arch/*/include/asm/oprofile*.h
F: arch/*/oprofile/
F: drivers/oprofile/
F: include/linux/oprofile.h
......@@ -5492,7 +5504,7 @@ S: Maintained
F: drivers/mmc/host/tmio_mmc.*
TMPFS (SHMEM FILESYSTEM)
M: Hugh Dickins <hugh.dickins@tiscali.co.uk>
M: Hugh Dickins <hughd@google.com>
L: linux-mm@kvack.org
S: Maintained
F: include/linux/shmem_fs.h
......
VERSION = 2
PATCHLEVEL = 6
SUBLEVEL = 34
EXTRAVERSION = -rc6
EXTRAVERSION =
NAME = Sheep on Meth
# *DOCUMENTATION*
......
......@@ -17,8 +17,8 @@
#define ATOMIC_INIT(i) ( (atomic_t) { (i) } )
#define ATOMIC64_INIT(i) ( (atomic64_t) { (i) } )
#define atomic_read(v) ((v)->counter + 0)
#define atomic64_read(v) ((v)->counter + 0)
#define atomic_read(v) (*(volatile int *)&(v)->counter)
#define atomic64_read(v) (*(volatile long *)&(v)->counter)
#define atomic_set(v,i) ((v)->counter = (i))
#define atomic64_set(v,i) ((v)->counter = (i))
......
......@@ -405,29 +405,31 @@ static inline int fls(int x)
#if defined(CONFIG_ALPHA_EV6) && defined(CONFIG_ALPHA_EV67)
/* Whee. EV67 can calculate it directly. */
static inline unsigned long hweight64(unsigned long w)
static inline unsigned long __arch_hweight64(unsigned long w)
{
return __kernel_ctpop(w);
}
static inline unsigned int hweight32(unsigned int w)
static inline unsigned int __arch_weight32(unsigned int w)
{
return hweight64(w);
return __arch_hweight64(w);
}
static inline unsigned int hweight16(unsigned int w)
static inline unsigned int __arch_hweight16(unsigned int w)
{
return hweight64(w & 0xffff);
return __arch_hweight64(w & 0xffff);
}
static inline unsigned int hweight8(unsigned int w)
static inline unsigned int __arch_hweight8(unsigned int w)
{
return hweight64(w & 0xff);
return __arch_hweight64(w & 0xff);
}
#else
#include <asm-generic/bitops/hweight.h>
#include <asm-generic/bitops/arch_hweight.h>
#endif
#include <asm-generic/bitops/const_hweight.h>
#endif /* __KERNEL__ */
#include <asm-generic/bitops/find.h>
......
......@@ -685,8 +685,8 @@ proc_types:
W(b) __armv4_mmu_cache_off
W(b) __armv4_mmu_cache_flush
.word 0x56056930
.word 0xff0ffff0 @ PXA935
.word 0x56056900
.word 0xffffff00 @ PXA9xx
W(b) __armv4_mmu_cache_on
W(b) __armv4_mmu_cache_off
W(b) __armv4_mmu_cache_flush
......@@ -697,12 +697,6 @@ proc_types:
W(b) __armv4_mmu_cache_off
W(b) __armv5tej_mmu_cache_flush
.word 0x56056930
.word 0xff0ffff0 @ PXA935
W(b) __armv4_mmu_cache_on